On Re-reading

510c48qigil-_sx319_bo1204203200_

Currently, I am reading Pride and Prejudice for my English Literature class this semester. I read this last semester when I took a Jane Austen class, where we read all six major novels of Austen. I am enjoying the experience of re-reading, especially having a different context for the novel (before, I read it in the context of her other novels; now, I am reading it in the context of other British literature from 1700-1900). I am catching things that I didn’t before, and my opinions of characters are different this time through.

Thinking about re-reading, I have thought back on some books that, when I read them, didn’t seem to impact me, but as I have reflected, they have begun to grip my mind. Two books have been resurfacing in my thoughts:

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

51-fueeocvl-_sy344_bo1204203200_

Dubliners by James Joyce

51yoidgqivl-_sx323_bo1204203200_

Every time I think about these books, or look through passages I underlined, or talk to someone who has read these, I am further convinced of their greatness; and I further realize how much these books have affected me; and I remember images painted by the words that have stuck in my mind.

This is only shows that I need to re-read these books.

Here are some words from my favorite C.S. Lewis book, An Experiment in Criticism, a work that has affected me more so than almost any other book:

Certainly, as soon as they can read for themselves, the two groups are already divided. There are those who read only when there is nothing better to do, gobble up each story to ‘find out what happened’, and seldom go back to it; and others who reread and are profoundly moved. (p. 13; emphasis mine)

80007

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s